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EPISODE 39 | 27 MINS

Cap and Trade, Where Do We Go From Here? – Climate Adaptation Series, Part 4

WITH KATE MEIS, JONATHAN PARFREY, AND STEVE FRISCH


New to this series? Catch up, starting with Part 1 of our Climate Adaptation Series HERE.

 

TOPIC

Building Support and Communication

IN THIS EPISODE

01:57 Steve answers the question of how to build a support and communication network for the cap and trade program and other programs to fight climate change.
05:30 Kate describes if the environmental justice community is a group that needs to be brought on board to continue support for cap and trade.
06:52 Jonathan speaks to the involvement of the environmental justice community to support cap and trade.
08:08 Steve talks about the reduction of emissions in markets.
09:49 Steve discusses communities that are exposed to pollution and how this impacts life expectancies.
11:02 Jonathan weighs in on the discussion of pollution.
16:07 Steve joins in on the topic of pollution.
17:26 Jonathan talks about the image of the climate movement and the largest factor of pollution.
19:17 Steve adds to the topic of pollution.
19:33 Jonathan speaks to getting a new brand for fighting climate change.
19:56 Kate mentions a branding campaign to communicate the need for change.
21:28 Mike mentions the need for rethinking how communities and cities are built.
22:05 Jonathan identifies the biggest leverage point that would make a difference in climate impacts.
23:21 Steve identifies the biggest leverage point that would make a difference in climate impacts.


GUESTS

iea_guests-kate_meis

Kate Meis is the Executive Director of the Local Government Commission (LGC). Kate is a champion for local governments; a recognized leader in local climate change adaptation, mitigation and clean energy efforts; and an ardent coalition builder. She obtained a Masters of Science degree in Community and Regional Development from the University of California, Davis, and has a Sociology Bachelor’s degree from California State University, Sonoma.

Jonathan Parfrey is the Executive Director and Founder of Climate Resolve, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit, founded in 2010, that is dedicated to creating practical solutions to meet the climate challenge while making Southern California more livable and prosperous today and for generations to come by inspiring people at home, at work, and in government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution, as well as prepare for climate change impacts.

Steve Frisch is President of Sierra Business Council and one of its founding members. Over the last 20 years, Sierra Business Council has leveraged more than $100 million of investment in the Sierra Nevada and its communities through community and public-private partnerships. Sierra Business Council also manages the Sierra Small Business Development Center focusing on advancing sustainable business practices and linking new and expanding businesses to climate mitigation and adaptation funding.

ORGANIZATIONS

For over 35 years LGC has connected cutting-edge leaders from across the nation. Together they are advancing transformative policies and implementing innovative solutions for sustainable communities. LGC works to build livable communities and local leadership by connecting leaders via innovative programs and network opportunities, advancing policies through participation at the local and state level, and implementing solutions as a technical assistance provider and advisor to local jurisdictions. With roots in California and a national reputation, LGC offers inspiration, information, and partnership for local and regional champions dedicated to building thriving communities that integrate civic engagement with environmental, social and economic priorities.

Climate Resolve is a Los Angeles-based nonprofit, founded in 2010, that is dedicated to creating real, practical solutions to meet the climate challenge while building a better city for Angelenos. Their mission is to make Southern California more livable and prosperous today and for generations to come by inspiring people at home, at work, and in government to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and local air pollution, as well as prepare for climate change impacts.

Sierra Business Council pioneers and demonstrates innovative approaches and solutions to increase community vitality, economic prosperity, environmental quality, and social fairness in the Sierra Nevada. In the Sierra Nevada, change and challenge create opportunities. Through innovation, integrity, and respect, Sierra Business Council harnesses these opportunities by implementing projects that model proactive change. Their goal is a diverse, inventive, and sustainable region where the economy is vibrant, the land is thriving, and the communities offer opportunity for all. They act as steward leaders of the region, taking responsibility for the care and responsible management of our place, guided by the triple bottom line that considers the economy, environment, and community simultaneously.

TAKEAWAY QUOTES

“Of course we need metrics. Of course we need data. We need to be demonstrating what the job-creating benefits are, what the ecosystem benefits are, what the water-yield benefits are, what carbon-sequestration benefits are of implementing all of these programs. But we need a really smart communication strategy that hits people in where their values really are.”

“Some people respond to the data. Some people respond to the story. Some people respond to the risk, the threat. But we have to be smart enough to put all of that together and deliver all of those messages and do it in a way that we tell people we can make a difference, we can make a change, we can solve this problem for the seventh generation.”

“I think one of the really interesting stories behind the cap and trade program so far is that it has been so remarkably successful. I mean, we really are on track to reduce our emissions by 20% by 2020, probably more than that. And it’s pretty clear that we can do 40% by 2030, and that benefits everyone, including disadvantaged communities.”

“There is a way to transition to an almost-zero carbon economy, but it really is going to take fifty years to really get there, to decarbonize industrial processes and all of the transportation networks and products and everything else. We’re really, at this point, dealing with the low-hanging fruit, which is switch to renewable energy and begin to create lower carbon fuels.”

RESOURCES

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 36: Making the Global Local – Climate Adaptation Series We kick off our Climate Adaptation Series by discussing how although climate change is global in nature, its impacts are felt locally.

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 37: Climate Communication—Climate Adaptation Series, Part 2 In Part 2 of our Climate Adaptation Series, we share methods for communicating climate change issues to diverse stakeholder groups.

Infinite Earth Radio Episode 38: Economics of Climate Change-Climate Adaptation Series, Part 3 In Part 3 of our Climate Adaptation Series, we discuss how to fund and finance climate adaptation equitably, when disadvantaged communities are at the greatest risk.

2016 Climate Adaptation Forum

Local Government Commission (LCG)

Climate Resolve

Sierra Business Council

THANKS FOR LISTENING

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